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I grew up in a family of Southern storytellers. Back in 2004, I started Whole Bean to continue the tradition in a new medium. Over the years, I've written about families and friends, peculiar situations, extended road trips, recalcitrant home appliances, and many things for which I'm truly grateful. I hope you enjoy your time here.
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Introducing the Dilano


OK. You saw it here first...for real...the introduction of a brand-new coffeehouse term. I made up this word, and I think it's simply smashing. Besides, this site is called Whole Bean, and I have a reputation to maintain over here.

Have you noticed as of late that Starbucks has started placing little green stirrers with fancy tops on the counter? They're almost like regular stirrers, but they serve a dual purpose: not only can they be used as genuine stirrers for tall cups (grande and venti size cups are too deep, mind you), but they can also be used to seal the little hole through which you sip your coffee. This is extremely useful when you're carrying a hot cup of coffee (or two) in your car. No spills, no mess. Truly, an inspired invention on the part of SBUX.

Well, I have yet to hear these stirrers called by any specific name, so I've coined my own term. I shall hereafter refer to them as "dilanos". "Dilano" sounds like "Milano", which is, of course, a modern northern Italian city. Since there are so many Italian espresso roasts and references out there in the coffee world, "dilano" seems quite appropriate in this context. Plus, the word sort of rolls off the tongue, as in, "Excuse me, Donatella, but would you please grab a few dilanos for the car?" I totally like this word, but of course, I'm partial.

So the next time you visit Starbucks (especially if you use the drive-thru) for a to-go cup of your favorite premium brew, ask for a dilano. Try it, and see what happens. At first, the barista might be confused, but over time, this term will catch on and make its way into common coffee parlance. As Men's Wearhouse founder George Zimmer would say, "I guarantee it."